Taleb: Marketing beyond information is insecurity

I spend a lot of time in my real estate business putting information out there. If you follow me, you know I’m almost daily putting out market stats, average values, talking about trends, giving advice, etc.

When I read this statement in Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s Antifragile, I was metaphorically (and possibly literally) rocked.

Marketing beyond information is insecurity.

It articulates a core mantra I have; that is, “If my marketing as I define my actions – that being advocacy through information and education – doesn’t work to maintain and build my business, I will do something different.”

I rarely talk about my sales metrics, volume, success in negotiation of deals. To me, those aren’t what this is about for me. It’s about helping folks make informed decisions, stepping back and letting them make the actual decision.

 

DRAFT: Synthesis / development of a framework

I am working on developing a framework based on the principles in these books. This is the “flow” as it speaks to me currently.

Here are the Amazon (non affiliate) links for these works:

Linchpin by Seth Godin

Finite & Infinite Games by James P. Carse

Think & Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill 

Antifragile by Nassim Taleb

Science, Strategy & War by Frans P.B. Osinga

Ego is the Enemy by Ryan Holiday

10thHuman: Multiple Businesses as a means of defense against changing market conditions

credit: pixabay

I am currently in discussions with another entrepreneur about starting up another business idea, unique in our market. The idea is a niche one and the first business to implement will likely enjoy a first mover advantage.

I was asked by another individual why I am always on the lookout for new ideas. My reasons are several:

  1. If I can, I want to help other entrepreneurs.
  2. What got you there won’t keep you there.
  3. Market and job conditions change.

Focus in your primary profession is important but so is being constantly on the lookout for new ideas, as a defense against changing market conditions.

5 Questions to Ask in a Changing Job Market

image from pixabay
image from pixabay

The world is changing. Emerging technologies in automation and virtual and augmented reality are just a tip of the iceberg. I was reading this morning about a new field of study regarding artificial intelligence; particularly, there’s a new discipline being created as we speak in the study of AI.

I believe the next 5-10 years will usher in many fantastic changes.

However, this comes with a cost. Namely, our jobs are going to be impacted. How can you prepare for the pivot you’ll need to stay employed?

I’m reading “A More Beautiful Question” by Warren Berger and he’s proposed several questions you can/should ask yourself in looking ahead:

How is my field/industry changing?

What trends are having the most impact on my field, and how is that likely to play out over the next few years?

Which of my existing skills are the most useful and adaptable in this new environment – and what new ones do I need to add?

Should I diversify more – or focus on specializing in one area?

Should I be thinking more in terms of finding a job – or creating one?

Change is coming. 

Be ready. Be a step ahead.

Act.

Whiplash: The future will run on an entirely new operating system.

image from pixabay
image from pixabay

I’m reading Whiplash right now and just read this in a passage.

The future will run on an entirely new operating system.

This book is about how to think about and leverage the changes coming our way.

Why is this important? 

Because if you are not disruptive, you will be disrupted.

What are the questions you should be asking in your industry?

What new technology will impact you? 

What skills should you be learning or enhancing?

Idea: Learning to code

image from pixabay
image from pixabay

Business Insider has a quick read up about the benefits of even an introductory course to coding. I concur.

I think taking a coding course opens up the idea of the synthesis of ideas. It helps you see connections between seemingly or potentially disparate ideas.

If you’re looking for a new career path and into the idea of coding, I would seriously consider learning Unity. I think there will be a huge need for the skill with the coming of Augmented Reality.

Idea: Augmented reality and driving

image from pixabay
image from pixabay

I foresee a future where the windshields of our cars or the glasses we are wearing will project data from road markers to collision warnings into our field of vision. The same technology will be able to monitor the eyeballs of drivers and automatically slow down, pull over and stop a car where the driver has fallen asleep.

Warp Speed, Mr. Sulu! Or, how I am trying to be more intentional in life and business

credit: pixabay
credit: pixabay

As a society, in almost every imaginable way, we are moving at Warp Speed.

In our personal lives, in our relationships, in our businesses, we are – to quote the great Seth Godin – ‘times 10‘ all the time.

When was the last time you hit pause and throttled back for a moment to evaluate what you are doing and how?

I think about this a lot. I’ve blogged about the needs of business to have a framework like OODA, where they are engaged in a systematic evaluation of there business space. I’ve also talked about the need to constantly evaluate strategy.

Remember, what got you there will not keep you there. (me)

The ability to learn faster is the only sustainable competitive advantage.(Senge)

How are you implementing this in your life/business?

10thHuman: Perspective. Have you seen the world through my eyes?

credit: pixabay
credit: pixabay

Have you seen the world through my eyes?

The question was asked in response to my having offered assistance to a complete stranger. When I relayed what I’d done to a friend, they offered that they would have wanted to do the same but would have hesitated in doing so for a fear of physical safety.

This is a question I think about every day and could be – should probably be – the subject of a much larger post than this is likely to be.

Have you seen the world through my eyes? 

This question stopped me in my tracks when it was asked and still resonates with me today, in a profound way. It’s a question I have asked thousands of young leaders, when I taught a course on leadership, ethics and perspective at the United States Air Force Academy.

The short answer is, of course, “No.”

The longer answer is, “What a powerful question to ask. While I cannot do so, I can and surely ought to try.”

From a personal and business perspective, sincerely asking this question launched a journey of introspection of which this blog is the current manifestation.

From a business perspective alone, what an incredible cornerstone of a framework to consider our actions through.

Have we seen the world through the eyes of a consumer or a client?

Have we seen the world through the eyes of our partners or vendors

Have we seen the world through the eyes of our employees? 

Phrased and applied another way:

Have we tried to see ourselves as others see us?

I don’t offer definitive answers here, just food for thought.

10thHuman: Do I need a grandiose vision?

globe-1290379_640No.

No, you do not.

This is not to say you don’t need a long term plan, or that you don’t need to be thinking about the future of your business.

Here, I mean does your vision have to be grandiose…does it have to solve a global problem?

I suggest the answer to that question is, “No.”

In my profession as a Realtor®, my mission is to help people at their level of need at the moment in time I connect with them.

In my passion as a blogger here, my mission is to connect with YOU and share my thoughts on personal and business development.

I don’t think I can change the world; I’m just trying to change the small part of it around me.